Class and Statutory News

REPORT OF THE IMO CARRIAGE OF CARGOES AND CONTAINERS SUB-COMMITTEE SIXTH SESSION (CCC 6) 9 TO 13 SEPTEMBER 2019

Sep. 20 2019

 

MARINE & OFFSHORE DIVISION MANAGEMENT

 

L-C&R

 

CCC 6 – 9th to 13th september 2019

 

 

 

major outcomes of the 6th session of the SUB-COMMITTEE ON CARRIAGE OF CARGOES AND CONTAINERS

 

 

 

SUMMARY

 

 The Sub-Committee on Carriage of Cargoes and Containers held its sixth session from 9 to 13 September 2019 (CCC 6).

 

 CCC 6 Agreed to :

 

·    draft amendment to regulation 9.4.8 and 9.6.1 of part A-1 of the IGF Code regarding shutdown valves (item 3) ;

 

·    draft amendment to regulation 9.6.1 of part A-1 of the IGF Code regarding purging requirements (item 3) ;

 

·    draft amendment to regulation 11.6.2 of part A-1 of the IGF Code on portable dry powder fire extinguisher - fire protection of fuel preparation rooms(item 3) ;

 

·    draft amendment to regulation 15.4.1.3 of part A-1 of the IGF Code regarding liquid level gauges (item 3) ;

 

·    draft Guidelines for the acceptance of alternative metallic materials for cryogenic service in ships carrying liquefied gases in bulk and ships using gases or other low-flashpoint fuels, and the associated draft MSC circular, with a view to approval by MSC 102 (item 4) ;

 

·    draft consequential revision to the Interim guidelines on the application of high manganese austenitic steel for cryogenic service (MSC.1/Circ.1599), with a view to approval by MSC 102 (item 4) ;

 

·    draft amendments to annex 13 of the CSS Code and the associated MSC circular on Reduction curve for basic accelerations due to significant wave height regarding weather-dependent lashing, for submission to MSC 102 for approval (item 7) ;

 

·    draft consequential amendments to the cargo-related IMO instruments  (item 7).

 

 CCC 6 also agreed to the following UIs of the IGC code, for approval by MSC 102 (item 8) :

 

·    paragraphs 4.20.1.1 and 4.20.1.2

 

·    paragraph 5.12.3.1

 

·    paragraph 5.13.1.1.2

 

·    paragraph 8.1

 

·    paragraph 13.2.2

 

·    paragraph 13.9.3

 

·    paragraphs 11.2 and 11.3.4

 

·    paragraphs 5.4.4 and 5.13.2.4

 

·    paragraphs 5.6.5 and 18.9

 

·    paragraph 5.6.6

 

·    paragraph 13.6.4

 

·    paragraph 16.7.1.4

 

 

 

CCC 6 instructed :

 

·    E&T 33 to prepare the draft amendments (06-21) to the IMSBC Code (item 5) ;

 

·    E&T 32 to finalize the draft amendments (40-20) to the IMDG Code, based on documents submitted to CCC 6, with a view to submitting the draft amendments to MSC 102 for consideration and adoption (item 6).

 

 Due to time constraints CCC 6 could not finalize the draft Interim guidelines on fuel cells and agreed to include this work item in the draft terms of reference of the correspondence group.

 

 Item 3 - Amendments to the igf code and development of guidelines for low-flashpoint fuels

 

Consideration and analysis of reports on alleged inadequacy of port reception facilities

 

CCC 5 had re-established the Correspondence Group on Development of Technical Provisions for the Safety of Ships using Low-flashpoint Fuels, to continue the work on the draft Interim guidelines on fuel cells and the consideration on low-flashpoint oil fuels.

 

 

 

Draft Interim guidelines for the safety of ships using fuel cell power installations, in particular

 

 Due to time constraints CCC 6 could not finalize the draft Interim guidelines on fuel cells and agreed to include this work item in the draft terms of reference of the correspondence group.

 

 However, important progress were made regarding the following topics.

 

 Design principles for fuel cell power installations – fuel cell spaces

 

 Number of delegations estimated that the A-60 class division for fuel cell spaces, which included fuel cell enclosures, could be an excessive requirement, particularly if such fuel cell spaces were adjacent to water ballast tanks, voids etc.

 

 A fuel cell enclosure could be relatively small and an A-60 class division would be difficult to design, particularly if additional piping, valve and other appendages were to be included. It was considered that it would be preferable to allow for the room containing the fuel cell space to be insulated to an A-60 class division standard instead.

 

 Hence, CCC 6 agreed to allow alternative designs where A-60 class divisions were deemed impracticable

 

 Arrangement and access

 

 CCC 6 agreed that fuel cell spaces should be arranged outside of accommodation spaces, service spaces, machinery spaces of category A and control stations.

 

 Area classification

 

 In considering the hazardous area categorization, CCC 6 discussed the two concepts available for an area classification:

 

·    the proposed prescriptive provisions in 4.2.2

 

·    classification according to standard IEC 60079-10.

 

 The Sub-Committee agreed that a hazardous zone designation in accordance with 4.2.2 of the draft Interim guidelines would be the default step and, if considered inappropriate for the individual design, calculation according to IEC 60079-10 should be applied with special consideration by the Administration.

 

 Safety provisions regarding low-flashpoint fuel oils

 

 CCC 6 had for its consideration a FSA study on safety-related issues for the potential use of low-flashpoint oil fuels as a marine fuel as well as draft amendments to the IGF Code to regulate the use of such fuels.

 

 Many delegates expressed concerns regarding the outcome of the FSA study, questioning its boundary conditions, in particular the 45°C engine room temperature which, in hotter climates, could well be exceeded; sound research of real-world conditions were considered still outstanding.

 

 Some delegations cautioned prioritizing this work to aid in the implementation of the 2020 sulphur limit and highlighted that expanding the scope of the available fuel oil grades to meet the 2020 demand should be done considering all related safety aspects before any new provisions were agreed.

 

 In this context, CCC 6 agreed that, at this stage, it is premature to decide whether the safety provisions should be a new chapter in the IGF Code or guidelines.

 

 It agreed to task a Correspondence Group to develop amendments to the IGF Code to address safety provisions for low-flashpoint oil fuels.

 

 Draft amendments to part A-1 of the IGF Code

 

 Regulations 9.4.8 and 9.6.1

 

 Paragraph 9.4.8 of the Code states:

 

"9.4.8 There shall be one manually operated shutdown valve in the gas supply line to each engine upstream of the double block and bleed valves to assure safe isolation during maintenance on the engine."

 

 Safe isolation during maintenance should also be required for other gas consumers – such as boilers, gas combustion units and gas turbines.

 

 Consequently, IACS proposes the following amendments to paragraph 9.4.8 (shown as additions/deletions) was agreed :

 

"9.4.8 There shall be one manually operated shutdown valve in the gas supply line to each engine gas consumer upstream of the double block and bleed valves to assure safe isolation during maintenance on the engine gas consumer."

 

 

 

Paragraph 9.6.1 of the Code states:

 

"9.6           Fuel piping in gas-safe machinery spaces shall be completely enclosed by a double pipe or duct fulfilling one of the following conditions:

 

.1 the gas piping shall be a double wall piping system with the gas fuel contained in the inner pipe. The space between the concentric pipes shall be pressurized with inert gas at a pressure greater than the gas fuel pressure. Suitable alarms shall be provided to indicate a loss of inert gas pressure between the pipes. When the inner pipe contains high pressure gas, the system shall be so arranged that the pipe between the master gas valve and the engine is automatically purged with inert gas when the master gas valve is closed; or"

 

 Confusion is caused by paragraph 9.6.1 including purging requirements for high pressure systems. IACS also notes that the specific identification of high pressure purging and inert functions, currently provided  in  paragraph 9.6.1, is not provided in the requirements in paragraph 9.4.7 of the IGF Code. On this concept, there is no justification for a difference between high pressure and low pressure systems; and IACS considers that these inconsistent requirements can lead to different interpretations of the requirements.

 

 Hence, the following amendments to paragraph 9.6.1 was agreed (shown as additions/deletions):

 

 "9.6           Gas fuel piping in gas-safe machinery spaces shall be completely enclosed by a double pipe or duct fulfilling one of the following conditions:

 

 

 

.1               the gas fuel piping shall be a double wall piping system with the gas fuel contained in the inner pipe. The space between the concentric pipes shall be pressurized with inert gas at a pressure greater than the gas fuel pressure. Suitable alarms shall be provided to indicate a loss of inert gas pressure between the pipes. When the inner pipe contains high pressure gas, the system shall be so arranged that the pipe between the master gas valve and the engine is automatically purged with inert gas when the master gas valve is closed; or"

 

 Regulation 11.3.1 on fire protection of fuel preparation rooms

 

 CCC 6 agreed to narrow down the application of SOLAS regulation II-2/9 to fuel preparation rooms instead of "any space containing equipment for the fuel preparation".

 

 Regulation 11.6.2 on portable dry powder fire extinguisher - fire protection of fuel preparation rooms

 

 CCC 6 had for its consideration proposals for an amendment to regulation 11.6 of chapter 11,  Part A-1 of the    IGF Code, in order to address the requirements for portable fire extinguishers.

 

 It agreed to the following amendment:

 

 

 

ʺIn addition to any other portable fire extinguishers that may be required elsewhere in IMO instruments, one portable dry powder extinguisher of at least 5 kg capacity shall be located near the bunkering station [and in a fuel preparation room].ʺ

 

 

 

Regulation 15.4.1.3 on liquid level gauges

 

 The Plenary was of the view that the regulations on liquid level gauging in the IGF Code should be aligned with the IGC Code and allow liquid level gauging systems which penetrate the tank.

 

 Paragraph 15.4.1.3 is amended to read as follows:

 

 

 

15.4.1.3 Liquefied gas fuel tank liquid level gauges may be of the following types:

 

 

 

.1           indirect devices, which determine the amount of fuel by means such as weighing or in-line flow metering; or

 

 

 

.2           closed devices, which do not penetrate the liquefied gas fuel tank, such as devices using radio-isotopes or ultrasonic devices; or

 

 

 

 Development of safety provisions for ships using LPG fuels

 

 CCC 6 agreed to the need to develop safety provisions for ships using LPG fuels, as a number of shipowners had already sought clarification on the safety requirements from their Administrations in this respect.

 

 It tasked the intersessional correspondence group to consider this topic.

 

 Item 4 – amendments to the IGC and IGF codes to include high manganese austenitic steel and related guidance for approving alternative metallic material for cryogenic service

 

 

Guidelines for the acceptance of alternative metallic materials for cryogenic service in ships carrying liquefied gases in bulk and ships using gases or other low-flashpoint fuels

 

 CCC 5 decided to expand the output on "Suitability of high manganese austenitic steel for cryogenic service and development of any necessary amendments to the IGC and IGF Codes" to include related guidance for approving alternative metallic material for cryogenic service.

 

 CCC 5 instructed the Correspondence Group to develop guidance on the procedure for considering and approving alternative metallic material for cryogenic service and to gather and evaluate information and data.

 

 CCC 6 have agreed to the draft Guidelines for the acceptance of alternative metallic materials for cryogenic service in ships carrying liquefied gases in bulk and ships using gases or other low-flashpoint fuels, and the associated draft MSC circular, with a view to approval by MSC 102.

 

 The Guidelines provide detailed guidance on how to document alternative metallic materials for their suitability and compliance with the IGC and IGF Codes, and a framework for evaluation and approval of alternative metallic materials for cryogenic service.

 

 The requirements for metallic materials used in low temperature applications on board ships constructed in accordance with the IGC and IGF Codes are contained in tables 6.2, 6.3 and 6.4 of the IGC Code and tables 7.2, 7.3 and 7.4 of the IGF Code, respectively. The requirements are identical in both Codes and specify the minimum design temperatures for specific materials based upon chemical composition, mechanical properties and heat treatment. These approved materials have been incorporated in the Codes since their inception and have provided over 40 years of satisfactory service experience.

 

 There is recent interest in adding new metallic materials to the list of those already covered by the Codes. Interim guidelines on the application of high manganese austenitic steel for cryogenic service were adopted and disseminated as MSC.1/Circ.1599. In the process of developing the Interim guidelines, significant experience in the evaluation of this alternative material was acquired. The recommendations contained in MSC.1/Circ.1599 are used as the basis for these Guidelines.

 

 It was also agreed that service experience requirements applied to high manganese austenitic steel would be incorporated in the draft guidelines.

 

 The manufacturing process using an alternative metallic material was not a risk as it was the responsibility of the manufacturer, subject to verification by an RO, to ensure that the fabricated material had the expected properties after fabrication of the tank. This would be achieved through the manufacturing of at least one tank placed in relevant service.

 

 Maximum thickness of material tested and consequential revision to MSC.1/Circ.1599

 

 CCC 6 agreed that the draft guidelines applied to alternative metallic materials having a maximum thickness of 40 mm. In doing so, it considered the increase of the maximum allowable thickness of high manganese austenitic steel referred to in the Interim guidelines on the application of high manganese austenitic steel for cryogenic service (MSC.1/Circ.1599), from 30 mm to 40 mm.

 

 Hence, CCC 6 similarly agreed to the consequential revision to the Interim guidelines on the application of high manganese austenitic steel for cryogenic service (MSC.1/Circ.1599), with a view to approval by MSC 102.

 

 

 

Expansion of the application of high manganese austenitic steel for other cargoes

 

 The expansion of the scope of application of the Interim guidelines to ethane and ethylene was proposed by the delegation from the Republic of Korea. CCC 6 decided not to consider the proposal at this stage and that this issue could be considered in a correspondence group,

 

 

 

 Item 5 - Amendments to the IMSBC code and supplements

 

Reclassification of ammonium nitrate based fertilizer (non-hazardous)

 

 The draft individual schedules for ammonium nitrate-based fertilizer were further developed, taking into consideration that the technical issues should be discussed by E&T 33.

 

 CCC 6 instructed E&T 33 to consider a possible revision of CCC.1/Circ.4, after the finalized draft individual schedules for ammonium nitrate based fertilizer

 

 

 

Proposals for amendment 06-21 of the IMSBC code

 

 CCC 6 instructed E&T 33 to prepare the draft amendments (06-21) to the IMSBC Code, based on the documents submitted to CCC 6 and related documents submitted to E&T 33

 

 Substance identification number for bulk cargoes

 

 Germany had proposed to MSC 101 the development of amendments to the IMSBC Code to introduce a substance identification number for bulk cargoes. CCC 6 agreed to refer this proposal to E&T 33 for further consideration and inclusion, if appropriate, in amendment 06-21 to the IMSBC Code.

 

 Proposals for amendments to section 9 of the IMSBC Code and MSC.1/Circ.1600

 

 CCC 6 agreed in principle, to amendments to section 9, provision 9.2.3.7.3 of the IMSBC Code and referred the document to E&T 33 for further consideration and inclusion, if appropriate, in amendment 06-21 to the IMSBC Code

 

 The proposed amendment to section 9, provision 9.2.3.7.3 of the IMSBC Code is shown below :

 

"A material shall be classified as MHB when the corrosion rate on either a steel or aluminium surfaces is between 4 mm and 6.25 mm a year at a test temperature of 55°C when tested on both materials. For the purposes of testing steel, type S235JR+CR (1.0037 resp. St 37-2), S275J2G3+CR (1.0144 resp. St 44-3), ISO

 

3574:1999, Unified Numbering Systems (UNS) G10200 or SAE 1020, and for testing aluminium, non-clad, types 7075-T6 or AZ5GU T6 shall be used. An acceptable test is prescribed in the United Nations Manual of Tests and Criteria, part III, section 37. When the test is performed the sample shall contain at least 10% moisture by mass. If the representative sample of the cargo to be shipped does not contain more than 10% moisture by mass, water shall be added to the sample. A representative sample of the cargo shall be tested at typical as-shipped cargo conditions, including moisture content by mass, bulk density, particle size distribution and atmospheric conditions. The assessment of localized corrosion occurring upon the steel surface shall be performed using national or international standards. [The test shall be conducted in accordance with guidance developed by the Organization.]"

 

 

 

Proposals for new individual schedules

 

 CCC 6 agreed to refer documents to E&T 33 for further consideration, draft of new schedules about the following products :

 

·    Clam shell

 

·    Lead concentrate, leach product

 

·    Brown fused alumina

 

 

Item 6 - Amendments to the IMDG code and supplements

 

Draft amendment (40-20) to the IMDG Code

 

 The Plenary authorized E&T 32 to finalize the draft amendments (40-20) to the IMDG Code, based on documents submitted to CCC 6, with a view to submitting the draft amendments to MSC 102 for consideration and adoption.

 

 CCC 6 agreed to refer the following issues to  E&T 32 for further consideration :

 

·    simplification of segregation requirements by abolishing the distinction between acids and strong acids

 

·    assignment of alcoholates to the segregation group of alkalis and to require their segregation from acids

 

·    segregation from liquid organic substances when these organic substances did not meet the criteria for dangerous goods and were not declared as such

 

·    spontaneous ignition of charcoal and highlighting the issues that need to be considered for the safe transport of charcoal which has passed the N.4 test

 

·    new entry for UN 3549 (Medical Waste, Category A)

 

·    provision 5.2.2.2.1.1.2 (Provisions for labels)

 

·    provision 7.1.4.4.2 of the IMDG Code regarding "public access" to life-saving appliances

 

 CCC 6 agreed, in principle, to the consequential amendments to the Revised Emergency Response Procedures for Ships Carrying Dangerous Goods (MSC.1/Circ.1588) (EmS Guide), emanating from draft amendment 40-20 to the IMDG Code, and referred them to E&T 32 for finalization, with a view to approval at MSC 102 in 2020.

 

 Classification of UN portable tanks and ADR/RID tanks

 

 Competent authorities use dual classification of tank-containers in compliance with requirements applicable for UN portable tanks and requirements applicable for ADR/RID tanks at the same time.

 

 The Plenary endorsed the proposal that for the UN portable tanks, which meet the requirements of chapter 6.7 of the IMDG Code, additional classification as per chapter 6.8 of ADR/RID was not required.

 

 

 Item 7 - >Amendments to the CSS Code with regard to weather-dependent lashing

 

CCC 6 had for its consideration the report of the Correspondence Group on Weather-dependent Lashing

 

 

 

Draft amendments to annex 13 to the CSS code

 

 Reduction curve for basic accelerations due to significant wave height regarding weather-dependent lashing

 

 CCC 6 agreed to the draft amendments to annex 13 of the CSS Code and the associated MSC circular, for submission to MSC 102 for approval.

 

 Accelerations and reductions in section 7.1 of annex 13 should be the same for all types of ships and cargo types covered in the annex

 

 Additional performance factors should be considered, which could be included in a separate appendix to annex 13, e.g. reductions for semi-standardized cargoes, taking into account that the preferred calculation in paragraph 5 would be applicable to all types  of  cargoes  covered   by  annex   13 

 

 Operational procedures for weather-dependent lashing

 

 Concern was raised in plenary as to uniform implementation regarding "the decision on the level of cargo securing based on the length of the voyage and the weather forecast".

 

 CCC 6 modified the draft text accordingly on the "approved Cargo Securing Manual", and the monitoring of environmental conditions and ship motions to ensure that the level of cargo securing was appropriate throughout the voyage.

 

 Friction coefficient (table 5)

 

 The friction coefficient for "deck with grease or oil or ice" has been removed, as it would not be practical to implement and that the CSS Code assumed that the deck should be clear of grease, oil or ice.

 

 Longitudinal sliding

 

 CCC 6 has prepared the provision on "reduced operational speed" in order to calculate the maximum speed for not exceeding the limits of the securing arrangements.

 

 

 

New draft appendix 4 to annex 13 addressing semi-standardized cargoes

 

 It has been included in draft appendix 4 draft amendments on the followings:

 

·    elementary securing arrangements

 

·    friction coefficients, and effect of parking brake and wheel chocks for wheel-based cargoes;

 

·    performance factor Fp(1.15) in the calculations for transverse sliding, longitudinal sliding and transverse tipping.

 

 Concerns on the rule-of-thumb method, neglecting sea sloshing and block coefficients

 

 In addressing the concerns raised in plenary on the applicability of section 5 (Rule-of- thumb method), the provision on neglecting sea sloshing forces in section 7.1 and block coefficient, the Sub-Committee agreed that the rule-of-thumb method could be used for nearly any size of ship regardless of the location of stowage and any type of weather with the flexibility of alternatively using the advanced calculation method including weather-dependent lashing and did not make any amendments to section 5.

 

 It has modified the sentence accordingly regarding neglecting sea sloshing forces in order to bring more clarity, as follows:

 

"For voyages in a restricted area and with forecast wave heights for which no sea sloshing is expected, sea sloshing forces may be neglected.";

 

 Consequential amendments to the cargo-related IMO instruments emanating from draft amendments to Annex 13

 

 The Plenary agreed to the draft consequential amendments to :

 

·    MSC.1/Circ.1353/Rev.1 on the Revised guidelines for the preparation of the Cargo Securing Manual for submission to MSC 102 for approval and dissemination as MSC.1/Circ.1353/Rev.2 ;

 

·    Resolution A.581(14) on Guidelines for securing arrangements for the transport of road vehicles on ro-ro ships, for submission to MSC 102 for approval and subsequent adoption by the Assembly;

 

·    the Code of Safe Practice for Ships Carrying Timber Deck Cargoes, 2011 (2011 TDC Code) for submission to MSC 102 for approval.

 

 

 

 Item 8 - Unified interpretation of provisions of IMO safety, security and environment-related conventions

 

The Plenary endorsed the consolidated draft MSC circulars on UIs of the IGF Code and on UIs of the IGC Code, and invited MSC 102 to approve them.

 

 

 

Clarification of the IGF Code requirements

 

 Unified interpretation of paragraph 9.2.2 of part A-1 of the IGF Code

 

 CCC 6 considered the proposed unified interpretation on the use of segments of double walled pipes joined by common flanges where two o-rings represent the barriers against leakage into the engine-room instead of gas valve unit enclosure constructed as a continuous part of the double-barrier system.

 

 Noting that further work was required, it agreed to task the correspondence group if established, to discuss this matter further.

 

 Paragraph 9.3.1 of part A-1 of the IGF Code

 

 CCC 6 considered the proposed unified interpretation on the regulations on redundancy of fuel supply

 

 It agreed to task the correspondence group to discuss this matter further.

 

 Paragraphs 6.9.1.1 and 6.9.1.2 of part A-1 of the IGF Code

 

 CCC 6 considered the proposed unified interpretation on control of tank pressure and temperature (and, acknowledging that the existing unified interpretations in MSC.1/Circ.1558 sufficiently addressed the matter, did not agree on the proposal.

 

 Proposed draft unified interpretations to the IGC Code

 

 Unified interpretations for paragraphs 4.20.1.1 and 4.20.1.2 of the IGC Code

 

 CCC 6 agreed to the draft UIs of paragraphs 4.20.1.1 and 4.20.1.2 of the IGC Code

 

 In considering IACS Unified Interpretations GC20 and GC21 relating to paragraphs 4.20.1.1 and 4.20.1.2, respectively, of the "revised" IGC Code (resolution MSC.370(93)), it was noted that GC20 addressed, in particular, where tee welds can be accepted in type A or type B independent tanks; and GC21 clarified that paragraph 4.20.1.2 of the Code is applicable to type C independent tanks including bi-lobe tanks, primarily constructed of curved surfaces fitted with a centreline bulkhead.

 

(extract)

 

The regulation 4.20.1.1 is applicable to independent tanks of type A or type B, primarily constructed of plane surfaces. This includes the tank corners which are constructed using bent plating which is aligned with the tank surfaces and connected with in-plane welds.

 

 

 

The applicability of the expression "For dome-to-shell connections only" is clarified as follows:

 

-       Welded corners (i.e. corners made of weld metal) shall not be used in the main tank shell construction, i.e. corners between shell side (sloped plane surfaces parallel to hopper or top side inclusive if any) and bottom or top of the tank, and between tank end transverse bulkheads and bottom, top or shell sides (sloped plane surfaces inclusive if any) of the tank. Instead, tank corners which are constructed using bent plating aligned with the tank surfaces and connected with in-plane welds are to be used.

 

-       Tee welds can be accepted for other localized constructions of the shell such as suction well, sump, dome, etc. where tee welds of full penetration type shall also be used.

 

 

 

The regulation 4.20.1.2 is applicable to type C independent tanks including bi-lobe tanks, primarily constructed of curved surfaces fitted with a centreline bulkhead.

 

 

 

The applicability of the expression "Other edge preparations" is clarified as follows:

 

- Cruciform full penetration welded joints in a bi-lobe tank with centreline bulkhead can be accepted for the tank structure construction at tank centreline welds with bevel preparation subject to the approval of the Administration or recognized organization acting on its behalf, based on the results of the tests carried out at the approval of the welding procedure. (See below example.)

 

 

 

 

 

Unified interpretations for paragraph 5.12.3.1 of the IGC Code

 

 IACS submitted revision 1 of IACS UI GC25 regarding cargo piping insulation, as outlined in paragraph 5.12.3.1 of the IGC Code, in order to clarify the terms "to minimize heat leak" and "to protect personnel".

 

 CCC 6 agreed to the draft UI of paragraph 5.12.3.1 of the IGC Code for inclusion in the consolidated draft MSC circular containing the UIs related to the IGC Code that were agreed at this session.

 

(extract)

 

The phrase "a thermal insulation system as required to minimize heat leak into the cargo during transfer operations" means that properties of the piping insulation are to be taken into consideration when calculating the heat balance of the containment system and capacity of the pressure/temperature control system.

 

The phrase "cargo piping systems shall be provided with a thermal insulation system as required ... to protect personnel from direct contact with cold surfaces" means that surfaces of cargo piping systems with which personnel is likely to contact under normal conditions shall be protected by a thermal insulation, with the exception for the below examples:

 

-      surfaces of cargo piping systems which are protected by physical screening measures to prevent such direct contact;

 

-      surfaces of manual valves, having extended spindles that protect the operator from the cargo temperature; and

 

-      surfaces of cargo piping systems whose design temperature (to be determined from inner fluid temperature) is above minus 10 °C.

 

 

 

Unified interpretations for paragraph 5.13.1.1.2 of the IGC Code

 

 IACS submitted UI  GC26  regarding  type  testing  requirements  for  valves,  as  outlined  in  paragraph 5.13.1.1.2 of the IGC Code.

 

 CCC 6 agreed to the draft UI of paragraph 5.13.1.1.2 of the IGC Code.

 

(extract)

 

The expression "Each type of valve…shall be certified to a recognized standard" is interpreted to mean that:

 

1.  for pressure relief valves (PRVs) that are subject to IGC Code paragraph 8.2.5, the flow or capacity are to be certified by the Administration or Recognized Organization acting on its behalf; and

 

2.  for other types of valves, the manufacturer is to certify the flow properties of the valves based on tests carried out according to recognized standards.

 

 Unified interpretations for paragraph 8.1 of the IGC Code

 

 The Sub-Committee agreed to the draft UI of paragraph 8.1 of the IGC Code.

 

 This UI relies on IACS UI GC28 regarding guidance for sizing pressure relief systems for interbarrier spaces, as outlined in paragraph 8.1 of the IGC Code.

 

(extract)

 

1.1         The formula for determining the relieving capacity given in section 2 is developed for interbarrier spaces surrounding independent type A cargo tanks, where the thermal insulation is fitted to the cargo tanks.

 

1.2         The relieving capacity of pressure relief devices of interbarrier spaces surrounding independent type B cargo tanks may be determined on the basis of the method given in section 2, however, the  leakage rate is to be determined in accordance with 4.7.2 of the  IGC Code.

 

1.3         The relieving capacity of pressure relief devices for interbarrier spaces of membrane and semi-membrane tanks is to be evaluated on the basis of specific membrane/semi-membrane tank design.

 

1.4         The relieving capacity of pressure relief devices for interbarrier spaces adjacent to integral type cargo tanks may, if applicable, be determined as for type A independent cargo tanks.

 

1.5         Interbarrier space pressure relief devices in the scope of this interpretation are emergency devices for protecting the hull structure from being unduly overstressed in case of a pressure rise in the interbarrier space due to primary barrier failure. Therefore such devices need not comply with the requirements of 8.2.10, 8.2.11.1 and 8.2.11.2 of the IGC-Code.

 

 

 

Unified interpretations for paragraph 13.2.2 of the IGC Code

 

 CCC 6 agreed to the draft UI of paragraph 13.2.2 of the IGC Code.

 

 The Sub(Committee has for its consideration IACS UI GC27 regarding liquid level gauge, as outlined in paragraph 13.2.2 of the IGC Code.

 

(extract)

 

In order to assess whether or not only one level gauge is acceptable in relation to the aforesaid sentence, ‘can be maintained’ means that any part of the level gauge other than passive parts can be overhauled while the cargo tank is in service.

 

 Unified interpretations for paragraph 13.9.3 of the IGC Code

 

 The Plenary agreed to the draft UI of paragraph 13.9.3 of the IGC Code for inclusion in the consolidated draft MSC circular containing the UIs related to the IGC Code that were agreed at this session.

 

 IACS provided UI GC29 regarding integrated systems, as outlined in paragraph 13.9.3 of the      IGC Code, taking account of MSC/Circ.891 on Guidelines for the on-board use and application of computers.

 

(extract)

 

An "integrated system" referred to in paragraph 13.9.3 of the IGC Code is a combination of computer-based systems which are used for the control, monitoring/alarm and safety functions required for the carriage, handling and conditioning of cargo liquid and vapours and are interconnected in order to allow communication between computer-based systems and to allow centralized access to monitoring/alarm and safety information and/or command/control.

 

 Unified interpretations for paragraphs 11.2 and 11.3.4 of the IGC Code

 

 IACS submitted draft IACS unified interpretations of paragraphs 11.2 and 11.3.4 of the IGC Code regarding emergency fire pumps and new draft unified interpretations of  paragraph  11.3.4  of  the IGC Code regarding fire pumps used as spray pumps, which have been developed in light of the discussions at CCC 5

 

 Having considered the comments made at CCC 5, IACS had decided to delete part c) from the version of IACS UI GC22

 

 The ʺoriginal versionʺ of UI GC22 had been withdrawn prior to its intended entry-into-force date (1 July 2019); and the 'replacement' version of UI GC22 has been uniformly implemented by IACS Societies on ships constructed on or after 1 July 2019.

 

 CCC 6 agreed with the draft UIs as proposed.

 

(extract)

 

1   In paragraph 11.3.4 the term 'fire pumps' where not qualified by the word 'emergency' refers to the fire pumps required in accordance with SOLAS Reg.II-2/10.2.2.2.2."If all the fire pumps mentioned in paragraph 1 above supplying the water spray system (for covering the superstructures and deckhouses) are disabled due to a fire in any one compartment; then the emergency fire pump shall be sized to cover:

 

.1  the water spray system for the boundaries of the superstructures and deckhouses, and lifeboats, liferafts and muster areas facing the cargo area, (as per paragraph 11.3.4); and

 

.2  two fire hydrants (as per paragraph 11.2).

 

 2   When the ship is also fitted with a total flooding high expansion foam system protecting the engine-room (to comply with SOLAS II-2/10.4.1.1.2 and 10.5.1.1) and the emergency fire pump is intended to supply sea water to this system, then, the emergency fire pump shall also be sized to cover the foam system for dealing with an engine-room fire, when the main fire pumps are disabled.

 

 

 

3   Following the principle of dealing with one single fire incident at a time, it may be concluded that the emergency fire pump would not need to be sized to cover all three systems in 2 and 3 above (i.e. water spray, hydrants and foam) at the same time and would need only be sized to cover the most demanding area and required systems, as follows:

 

.1  the foam system + two hydrants; or

 

.2  the water spray system + two hydrants; whichever is greater.

 

 Paragraph 11.3.4 highlights requirements for availability of fire pumps required by SOLAS regulation II-2/10.2.2 for water supply to the spray system for personnel and survival craft and muster station protection. The supply of fire water shall be redundant.

 

 In view of the above, in cases when the emergency fire pump is used to meet this requirement; its capacity, in addition to being capable of maintaining two jets of water as required by    FSS Code, chapter 12.2.2.1.1, shall be increased taking into account the spray application rates stated in paragraph 11.3.2.1, but limiting coverage to boundaries of normally manned superstructures and deckhouses, survival crafts and their muster areas.

 

 For the purpose of this interpretation:

 

.1  the expression "one of the fire pumps or emergency fire pump" is related to fire pumps required by SOLAS regulation II-2/10.2.2 installed outside the space where spray pump(s) are located; and

 

.2  the expression "fire in one compartment", means a compartment provided with A-class boundaries in which is located the fire pump(s), or the source of power of the fire pump(s), serving the water-spray system in accordance with paragraph 11.3.3.

 

 Unified interpretations for paragraphs 5.4.4 and 5.13.2.4 of the IGC Code

 

 CCC 6 agreed to the draft UI of paragraphs 5.4.4 and 5.13.2.4 of the IGC Code

 

(extract)

 

1)           the term "duct" in 5.4.4 and 5.13.2.4 is meant to be the equipment enclosure required in 16.4.3.1 and 16.4.3.2 (e.g. GVU enclosure) and intended to contain any release of gas from inner pipe or equipment.".

 

2)           the term "design pressure of the outer pipe or duct" in 5.4.4 is:

 

-        the maximum pressure that can act on the outer pipe or equipment enclosure after the inner pipe rupture as documented by suitable calculations taking into account the venting arrangements; or

 

-        for gas fuel systems with inner pipe working pressure greater than 1 MPa, the "maximum built-up pressure arising in the annular space", after the inner pipe rupture, which is to be calculated in accordance with paragraph 9.8.2 of the IGF Code as adopted by MSC.391(95).

 

3)           The "maximum pressure at gas pipe rupture" in 5.13.2.4 is the maximum pressure to which the outer pipe or duct is subjected after the inner pipe rupture and for testing purposes it is the same as the design pressure used in 5.4.4.

 

 Unified interpretations for paragraphs 5.6.5 and 18.9 of the IGC Code

 

 The Sub-Committee agreed to the draft UI of paragraphs 5.6.5 and 18.9 of the IGC Code regarding cargo sampling.

 

(extract)

 

The requirements are applicable only if such sampling system is fitted onboard. Connections used for control of atmosphere in cargo tanks during inerting or gassing up are not considered as cargo sampling connections.

 

 

 

Unified interpretations for paragraph 5.6.6 of the IGC Code

 

 CCC 6 agreed to the draft UI of paragraph 5.6.6 of the IGC Code regarding cargo filters.

 

(extract)

 

Means to indicate that filters are becoming blocked and filter maintenance is required are to be provided for fixed in-line filter arrangement and portable filter installations where dedicated filter housing piping is provided.

 

Where portable filters for fitting to manifold presentation flanges are used without dedicated filter housing and these can be visually inspected after each loading and discharging operation, no additional arrangements for indicating blockage or facilitating drainage are needed.

 

 Unified interpretations for paragraph 13.3.7 and table 18.1 of the IGC Code

 

 CCC 6 agreed to the draft UI of paragraph 13.3.7 and table 18.1 of the IGC Code regarding operational inhibition of cargo pumps and the opening of manifold ESD valves during use of the override system

 

(extract)

 

  In applying the second sentence of note 4 of table 18.1, a hardware system such as an electric or mechanical interlocking device is to be provided to prevent inadvertent operation of cargo pumps and inadvertent opening of manifold ESD valves.

 

 

 

Unified interpretations for paragraph 13.6.4 of the IGC Code

 

 

 

The Sub-Committee agreed to the draft UI of paragraph 13.6.4 of the IGC Code regarding oxygen deficiency monitoring equipment in a nitrogen generator room area.

 

(extract)

 

      Two oxygen sensors shall be positioned at appropriate locations in the space or spaces containing the inert gas system, according to FSS Code 15.2.2.4.5.4, for all gas carriers irrespective of carriage of cargo indicated by an "A" in column "f" in the table of chapter 19.

 

 

Unified interpretations for paragraph 16.7.1.4 of the IGC Code

 

 CCC 6 agreed to the draft UI of paragraph 16.7.1.4 of the IGC Code regarding suitable pressure relief system for air inlet, scavenge spaces, exhaust system and crank case

 

(extract)

 

Suitable pressure relief system for air inlet manifolds, scavenge spaces and exhaust system shall be provided unless designed to accommodate the worst case overpressure due to ignited gas leaks or justified by the safety concept of the engine. A detailed evaluation regarding the hazard potential of overpressure in air inlet manifolds, scavenge spaces and exhaust system shall be carried out and reflected in the safety concept of the engine.

 

 For crankcases the explosion relief valves required by SOLAS regulation II-1 / 27.4 are considered suitable for the gas operation of the engine. For engines not covered by SOLAS regulation II-1 / 27.4 a detailed evaluation regarding the hazard potential of fuel gas accumulation in the crankcase shall be carried out.

 

 Item 10 - Revision of the inspection programmes for cargo transport units carrying dangerous goods

 

MSC 100 had noted a statement by the representative of FAO, affirming that CTU cleanliness was an integral part of the Code of Practice for Packing of Cargo Transport Units (CTU Code) and that FAO and the Secretariat of the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC) had proposed to include CTU cleanliness among the selection criteria for the container inspection programmes to be developed.

 

 CCC 6 had for its consideration draft amendments to the Inspection programmes for cargo transport units carrying dangerous goods (MSC.1/Circ.1442, as amended by MSC.1/Circ.1521), in order to widen the scope of the inspection programmes to include inspections of CTUs not containing dangerous goods and to include inspection criteria for pest contamination.

 

 There was general support to widen the scope of the inspection programmes to include inspections of CTUs not containing dangerous goods.

 

 CCC 6 agreed, in principle, to amend the inspection programme, in order to:

 

·    further clarify that the selection criteria should be applied equally to CTUs carrying all types of cargoes, rather than being specifically on those declared to be carrying dangerous goods;

 

·    adequately refer to the IMO/ILO/UNECE Code of Practice for Packing of Cargo Transport Units (CTU Code)

 

 CCC 6 commenced the review of MSC.1/Circ.1442 to ensure the circular was "fit for purpose" for the inspection of all CTUs and made appropriate reference to the CTU Code.

 

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Correspondence groups established by CCC 6

 

 

Correspondence group to deal with safety of ships using low-flashpoint fuels

 

 Terms of reference:

 

·    finalize the draft Interim guidelines for the safety of ships using fuel cell power installations,

 

·    develop draft amendments to the IGF Code to address safety provisions for ships  using  low-flashpoint  oil  fuels

 

·    develop interim guidelines to address safety provisions for ships using LPG fuels

 

·    finalize the remaining draft amendments to the IGF Code

 

·    further develop the draft UI regarding part A-1, paragraph 9.2.2 of the IGF Code

 

·    further develop the draft  UI regarding part  A-1,  paragraph 9.3.1 of the  IGF Code

 

 Correspondence Group on Suitability of High Manganese Austenitic Steel

 

 Terms of reference :

 

·    consider the expansion of the application of high manganese austenitic steel for other cargoes and fuels as defined in the IGC and IGF Codes;

 

·    consider the scope and design of simulation testing which may be considered equivalent to service experience required for the purpose of amending the IGC and IGF Codes;

 

·    consider the scope and design of compatibility testing of alternative metallic materials for the IGC Code cargoes or IGF Code fuels;

 

·    based on the evaluation of additional information above, develop draft amendments to the IGC and IGF Codes to include high manganese austenitic steel for cryogenic service.

 

 

 

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